Peter Lanyon: Liminality & Psychogeography

The art of Peter Lanyon - who died 53 years ago today - is, like all great art, uncompromising. For those seeking “Cornish Art”, it has none of the serenity of the calm seascapes on offer in every gallery in every tiny cove. But if you’re prepared to look beyond the initially daunting surface of … Continue reading Peter Lanyon: Liminality & Psychogeography

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Alain Robbe-Grillet: early fiction (part 3)

In this final part of my study of Robbe-Grillet's early fiction, with today being what would have been his 95th birthday, I'll look at the novel which, for me, sees him reach the high-point of the nouveau-roman; and a series of experimental (in the true sense of the word) short fictions. By the time of … Continue reading Alain Robbe-Grillet: early fiction (part 3)

Cornwall: two landscapes

Driving west on the A30, it's impossible to miss the post-industrial landscapes of clay- and tin-mining country. Whatever your feelings toward them, they are impressive, and very different from each other. Clay mining - the Cornish Alps - sprawl over the area north and west of St. Austell (and give the Eden Project it's home). … Continue reading Cornwall: two landscapes

21st century pseudonyms, or “furthermore known as the JAMMs”

On 23rd August, Faber will publish "2023: A Trilogy" by the Justified Ancients of Mu Mu. Written by (I am assuming) Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty, whose best-known guise is The KLF, the publication date will mark exactly 23 years to the day since the pair set fire to a million pounds in a disused … Continue reading 21st century pseudonyms, or “furthermore known as the JAMMs”